Today’s giveaway: Wildly Affordable Organic

Think you can’t eat organic on a budget? Author Linda Watson shows you how in “Wildly Affordable Organic.” Not only will you be eating on $5 a day or less but you’ll be helping the planet too.  To win one of two copies we are giving away, see below.

Watson is no stranger to eating on a budget. She and her husband took the “Food Stamp Challenge,” eating on the average national food-stamp allowance of a dollar a meal. Watson writes:

If you’ve wanted to eat like it matters but felt you couldn’t afford it, “Wildly Affordable Organic” is for you. It’s easy to think that “organic” or “sustainable” are code words for “too expensive.” More people than ever want to eat organic food, and the cost of energy is shooting up like genetically modified corn, but eating green doesn’t have to mean eating up all your money.

In the 235-page book, Watson eases you into a greener lifestyle with the Wildly Affordable Organic plans. She shares tips and tricks she learned from taking the challenge herself including seasonal menus, shopping list, and recipes.

What I like the most about Watson’s method is that she believes in taking it one recipe at a time so you don’t become overwhelmed. And most importantly you will not be deprived. How does red bean chili casserole with corn bread topping for din-din sound?

If your mouth is watering and you’d like to win a copy of Wildly Affordable Organic” leave a comment sharing what steps you’ve taken to save the planet while staying on a budget. Winners will be revealed Monday, June 20. You can also win one of 8 copies we are giving away as door prizes at Frugal Festival Food! on June 25 in LA or purchase the book on Amazon for $11.20.

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23 responses to “Today’s giveaway: Wildly Affordable Organic

  1. I’ve like to use cloth bags at the grocery store.

  2. We recycle our glass, plastic and cardboard. I use reusable grocery bags. I have installed programmab,e thermostats in my home. We have also installed water saver toilets. I know there are lots of other things we do, but I have not had my coffee yet.

  3. Kittie Encinas

    I’ve reused the paper bags from grocery stores to recycle my newspapers. I’ve used the plastic bags that you wrap your vegetables in when you shop to pick up dog poop when I walk my dogs instead of buying the packages of dog clean up bags.

  4. I’ve reused the paper bags from grocery stores to recycle my newspapers. I’ve used the plastic bags that my daily newspaper is wrapped in to pick up dog poop when I walk my dogs instead of buying the packaged dog clean up bags.

  5. I make my own compost and grow rogue veggies….I just dump my fruit and veggie trimmings into a hole I’ve dug in the backyard, the worms come racing to it and before you know it I have a beautiful spot to plant a seedling! Although, I usually have wild plants sprouting up from this source….spaghetti squash, butternut squash, onions, potatoes, avocado trees, leeks, beets, carrots, tomatoes, peach tree and chestnut trees just to name a few!

  6. We have really made an effort to not use plastic bags (or containers), to conserve water and plant drought resistant plants, to turn off and unplug appliances and lights. These steps help the planet and our budget.

  7. I have exchanged my incandescent bulbs for the more energy efficient bulbs, use re-usable bags while shopping, not just at the grocery store. I am planting tomatoes, peppers and maybe cucumbers in topsyturvey planters.

  8. Pingback: Bargain Babe» Festival door prizes, Gluten-free winners, Win “Wildly Affordable Organic”

  9. We bout a smart strip surge protector to save money and electricity.

  10. Michelle Ventresca

    I reuse recycle and re-everything! I do use my own bags at the grocery store, I recycle glass, plastic, cardboard and the like – we try to grow oour own food , but up here in the Santa Clarita valley the soil is sandy and the heat is oppressive in the summer – most veggies must be planted in the spring to be ready before the summer heat. I think buying organic is the only way to insure that we don’t take in any more toxins than we already do!!!

  11. We’re lucky to have curbside recycling and utilize it to the fullest. We use cloth grocery bags. If it can’t be recycled we try to reuse it, or freecycle it to someone who can. We built our own compost tumblers and rain barrels (2 of each) and I have a homemade worm bin of red wigglers inside. We use the energy saving bulbs and try to conserve energy whenever and however possible. We have a little garden that we deal with organically (which sadly meant picking off and terminating some poor little caterpillars that moved into our beans last month:( ). Always, always looking for more ideas about how to leave a smaller footprint!

  12. We eat organic, locally sourced, grass fed, seasonal and/or natural as often as possible, we make conscious efforts to turn off lights and faucets when not in use, we order farm fresh food from co-ops and share with family or friends, we grow some of our own veggies and swap them with friends who grow other veggies, and we reduce/reuse, recycle and repurpose as much as possible.

  13. I am really trying to buy more organic foods. I always compare the prices between organic and non-organic grown fruits and veggies at the store. I’m really surprised when the organic is only a few cents more. It makes me feel really good about my purchase!

  14. We continue to recycle everything, compost and this year we’re trying out only eating veggies from our garden. Really would like to win this book to give to my mom so she can join in!

  15. I simply started eating vegan. which really lowered my grocery bills down since i dont need to buy meats, eggs or cheese. I use canvas bags at the market and place buckets under my rain gutter drains to catch rain water to use when watering plants later on warm season.

  16. I reuse, recycle, reduce and repurpose to the point of annoying people around me.

  17. I reuse, recycle, reduce and reporpose to the point of annoying people around me. Of course I do the usual of glass, plastic and cans. Then I go the extra mile by collecting my friends recycling because they are too lazy to help the environment. I also reuse computer printing paper by using the other side as well as the other side of junk mailers. I reuse dryer softners sheets to dust with and then burn them for the cooking grill or patio fire pit(only doing this on permissive burn days). I reuse plastic food containers for drainers under my potted plants and put used coffee grounds in my flower beds, which allows worms to airate the soil. I enjoy thinking of new ways to reduce my “footprint”.

  18. I finally got in the habit of taking my own bag into the grocery store. I know it sounds silly, but I had a hard time remembering to do this and it has finally become a habit.

  19. I use recyclable bags at the grocery store. I use the plastic bags that come with the newspaper for doggy. I have been eating more organic foods including cereal.

  20. We recycle anything we can – glass, cans, paper – and bring e-waste to proper place. As much as possible, I hang dry laundry which keeps clothes in nicer shape, so much so that it’s a joy to hand my preschooler’s clothes to family and friends w/younger kids. Planning ahead makes a difference, from stacking coupons, coordinating errands to save time and gas, and being creative w/leftovers. Also, we’ve found that our daughter is as happy with going to the library for books, and a play oven, play washer and dryer made from decorating large diaper boxes and the blank side of paper bags with markers as/vs. expensive, plastic toys.

  21. We’ve banned purchasing bottled water. Now it’s all reusable bottles with filtered water from the sink. Save money, water and plastic. Seems the kids always left and unfinished bottle of water anyways. This way they fill just what they need.

  22. Pingback: Reader winners: Wildly Affordable Organic | Frugal Festival

  23. domestic diva

    We grow as much of our own produce as we can. We also buy in season.

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